Sammamish Valley Reclaimed Water Production Facility

King County, 
Washington

Sammamish Valley Reclaimed Water Production Facility

Project Highlights: 
  • Model for reliable production of reclaimed water.
  • Combines state-of-the-art technologies with innovative design and ecological and environmental sustainability.
MBR Membranes
MBR efficacy testing at King County's Hollywood Pump Station helped determine the feasibility of treating wastewater to a level suitable for agricultural irrigation.

The Puget Sound region faces significant challenges in meeting the water resource needs of both the environment and people. The King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks (KCDNRP) recognized that reclaimed water could serve as a significant new source of water to the region, deferring the need to develop new water sources and reducing withdrawals from local streams to benefit fish and other wildlife. In conjunction with its mission to expand the use of reclaimed water, KCDNRP proceeded with planning and preliminary design of a reclaimed water facility to help meet the growing water demands in the Sammamish Valley.

King County's Wastewater Treatment Division retained Carollo to conduct a pilot study of an MBR to test the feasibility of treating wastewater to a level suitable for unrestricted use for agricultural irrigation. The pilot facility was located at the Hollywood Pump Station along the Sammamish River Trail, a popular recreational area, to expose the public to the project and gain support for reclaimed water use. Applying reclaimed water to garden test plots managed by various local growers helped foster understanding of the benefits of irrigation with reclaimed water. Based on the success of the pilot study, King County moved forward and hired Carollo to provide preliminary design of a full-scale facility with an initial capacity of 1.5 mgd and an ultimate capacity of 5.0 mgd.

The Sammamish Valley Reclaimed Water Production Facility (RWPF) is the first of several planned satellite reclamation facilities and is considered a model for reliable production of reclaimed water.

Specifically, the goals of the RWPF include:

  • Providing a reliable, drought-resistant water supply for customers.
  • Enhancing fish runs by providing an alternative source of irrigation water.
  • Demonstrating the safety and environmental benefits of reclaimed water.
  • Constructing an economically, and ecologically, sustainable reclamation facility.
  • Identifying and meeting the needs of the communities.
  • Apply and incorporate sustainability to all design elements within the treatment process.
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