Bridge District Water Storage Facility and Park

City of West Sacramento, 
California

Bridge District Water Storage Facility and Park

Awards: 
2015 National Public Works Project of the Year (Small Cities/Rural Communities, Structures Category) - American Public Works Association
2014 Project of the Year (Small Agency Division, Parks and Trails Category, Sacramento Chapter) - American Public Works Association
2013 Field Erected Reservoir of the Year – Steel Tank Institute
Service Type: 
Project Highlights: 
  • 3.1-MG steel tank, pump station, and neighborhood park with aesthetic components featuring the value of water to the community
  • Obtained stakeholder approval for a new infrastructure project across the street from a new, upscale housing development
  • Landscaping and aesthetics that met stakeholder approval
  • Challenging seismic, foundation design, and construction issues
  • Sound attenuation features to minimize pump station noise
West Sac Bridge District Photo
The Bridge District water storage facility is directly across from a residential neighborhood. Aesthetics and communication with residents and other stakeholders during design and construction played a key role in the success of the project and acceptance by the community.

The Bridge District Water Storage Facility project was required to meet the water demands for the new development of the City of West Sacramento’s Triangle Specific Plan, which envisioned the Bridge District as a dense, pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use area featuring office, residential, and commercial development that would transform the District into an extension of the urban fabric of downtown Sacramento, including extensive riverfront amenities. The facility consists of the major components including 3.1 million gallon capacity above-ground steel storage tank, pump station building, electric transformer pad, perimeter fencing, motor-operated sliding gate with key pad entry, security, integrated SCADA, and the 1.5 acre water-themed Jerome D. Barry Park.

Given the geotechnical constraints, railroad right-of-way, and other challenges with the site, the large storage reservoir could not be buried. As such, it would occupy a large amount of the view space for the Ironworks Subdivision, a 187-unit residential development consisting of three-story lofts that are directly across the street from the project site. This resulted in considerable concern from the residents and developer. Carollo and the City held a series of meetings with the public and stakeholders to introduce the Bridge District Water Storage Facility and Park Project, obtain input, and answer questions. Through this public outreach process, the City received the input and approval needed to move forward with this critical infrastructure project.

Due to the small site and closeness of the tank and pump station to the park, the design team developed a park concept that celebrated the water infrastructure. Many of the park elements were designed with a water theme, with the tank serving as a water droplet in the middle of the site, and waves rippling out from the center in various forms of the park. To showcase the industrial nature of the area, the tank had colorful pipes around its perimeter, vertically to symbolize the water being delivered to the surrounding community and were spread throughout the park connecting it to the water facility. These pipes were backlit with colored LED lighting to continue the visibility of the facility at night. Other features included benches made from water pipes, a rain garden and stormwater swale and pipe spools within the pump station allowing park visitors to look into the pump station to the see the facility in action.